Last week we said a sad farewell to Billy Black.  Billy has been a regular at Cycle Right over the last year and those of you who frequent the shop will have at some point I’m sure met this laid back, amiable, cheerful, delightful young man.  Billy who worked at the NATO base has returned to his home in Virginia. We will miss him but it’s not so much of a goodbye more of a see you next time, as Billy will be back to participate in next year’s Tour of Cambridge with us.

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Billy walked into the shop to have his bike serviced and soon after he became one of our regulars, coming in to have a coffee, hang out and talk cycling.   He fell in love and bought his red Cipollini, thereafter being called “Cipollini Billy” by us.

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He enjoyed many rides with the regulars.

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Earned his sharp tan line at the Tour of Cambridge this year.

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What we didn’t realise until a few weeks ago was how much of a good cycling influenced we had had on Billy until we read what he wrote, “Neil and his amazing wife Azelia, have made me go so far in cycling and I can’t thank you enough.  You pushed me to go so far it’s amazing! If it wasn’t for you two, I wouldn’t have races around the world planned next year or strive to make the UCI world championships.  You’ll always have that Cycle Right in my name on Strava for what you’ve done for me.”  We hate goodbyes.

 

 

 

Those of you who frequent Cycle Right will know our Fernando, you’ll know what a helpful good natured person he is.

One might think Fernando spends most of the day eating cake, I have plenty of evidence to prove this;

Evidence #1

fernando eating cake

Evidence #2 – sometimes he has coffee with his cake

fernando eating meringue

Evidence #3 – more cake

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Evidence #4 – do we need to say any more on this point?  I think not.

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When he’s not eating his way through cake, (by the way if want to make him something special make him a Portuguese meringue or gooey brownie bars)

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the rest of the time you may think that he spends it posing.

Photographs don’t lie.

Posing evidence #1

fernando posing

Posing evidence #2

fernando with ktm

Apart from eating cake and posing, Fernando, as you may very well know leads the “relaxed” group on the Sunday shop rides.  And a good job he does too, making sure no one gets dropped and has an enjoyable ride.

Our monster eating cake helpful assistant Fernando, will for now stop leading the Sunday relaxed rides.  Fernando has entered the London 100 Prudential Race, and with only 6 weeks to go he needs some serious training.  If you have heard the story of his oh-so-painful experience at the Gran Fondo tour of Cambridge two weeks ago, you’ll understand how he needs this time to train.  On Sundays now he will be doing much needed long rides.

Please pass this message on to others who come on the relaxed shop rides, and that we are looking for someone who can take over Fernando, (eating cakes is not obligatory).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The shop rides will continue every Sunday with a minor change.  As you all know this is a family run shop and over the next few weeks we have family commitments on our only day off, Sundays, and for this reason we will not be able to open up the shop after the ride for coffees and teas.   Fernando leading the relaxed group is happy to fit a coffee stop on the route and the other groups can decide on the morning what they want to do as far as cafe stop is concerned.

Please join us on our facebook page by liking it or follow us on Instagram in order to keep up to date on changes for our rides.  Now that Spring is near there will be times when the fast group will want to meet up earlier to go for a longer ride.  Notices will be put up on facebook and Instagram prior to the Sunday.  If you have any queries about the rides you can message us through those pages.

 

 

  • Be a good bike rider. Turn up on time ready to leave, carry as a minimum – 2 tubes, a pump, a puncture repair kit, food, water, phone and a mini tool.
  • Let people know where you are. If you coming up inside give a shout. If there’s a hole, wet leaves or gravel give a loud shout if you feel comfortable in pointing it out.
  • Ride true. Avoid unnecessary swerving. Ride parallel to the side of the road or another rider. There is no excuses for riding in the middle of a busy road. When cornering hold your line, only the guy on the front has the privilege of the racing line. 33% more energy is saved when riding close to another riders wheel but its also safer. Keep a tight group and other road users will respect you more. Try to ride less than a metre from the wheel in front. Look ahead not at the rider in front’s back wheel. Limit breaking in a group to absolute necessary – no emergency stops!
  • Two a breast. Riding two a breast in a large group allows cars to safely overtake and pass quickly. It’s in the Highway Code! Single out on busy and narrow roads but remember to communicate your intentions.
  • Don’t surge. When on the front don’t accelerate. Keep the pulls steady and soft pedal when you pull off. Changing position in a group can be complex but generally when cycling in the UK you should pull off to the left out of passing traffic. Eat, drink and recover for the next pull.
  • There is a time and a place for heroics. Inevitably climbs will split a group and fast runs will stretch their legs from time to time, often before a cafe stop – good seats and first in the queue come at a cost.
  • Pedal the crests of climbs. It’s free speed! Don’t soft-pedal or free wheel. Additionally when on the front going downhill keep pedalling.
  • If you suffer a mechanical or need to stop, shout out and let the group know.
  • Keep your bike clean. Aside from looking and working better a bike reflects the rider.
  • Dress for the weather. Arm warmers, wind-proof tops, base layers, lights, always assume the worst and that you will be out for longer than anticipated. Mudguards are your bikes and fellow cyclists best friend in the winter.
  • Help out your fellow cyclists. We all have that bad day, we have all been the new guy or girl that is dropped time and time again. Your reaction to new cyclists can make or break their new found passion.

Check out this video for riding in a double paceline, it can be a constantly revolving paceline or turns on the front can often last up to 20 minutes on longer rides.